When you think of calisthenics, your mind might think of Lizzo’s hit song “Fitness.” If you need a refresher, the lyrics go a little something like this:

 

“Independent

Athletic

I been sweating

Doing calisthenics

Booty vicious

Mind yo business

I been working

Working on my fitness”

That single chorus put the term calisthenics on the map for many people who had no idea what it was, but what really goes on in the world of calisthenics might surprise you. We sat down with Nashville local, Eon Vincent, an active competitor in the calisthenics world to learn more about the mindset and training that this form of strength training requires.

 

If you were to see Eon perform a planche (or do tricks on a set of bars), it may come as a shock that he was never involved in sports growing up. In fact, Eon grew up on a farm and was educated in his home by his mother. He jokingly says that the only workout he partook in was helping deliver animals and the general upkeep of the land. So how did Eon go from baling hay to competing in one of the most technical sports to date? I’ll give you a hint – muscle up.

 

Eon recalls Terry, his father’s close friend, coming over to his house and showing Eon’s father a

muscle up. Shortly after, Eon and his siblings were lined up to give it a shot. He said that he

found the movement so simple, yet extremely difficult to execute. From then on he spent his time practicing muscle ups. 

 

Eon’s journey from muscle up to planche has been nothing short of painful. With multiple

breaks and tears along the way, he keeps coming back for more. His training is purely based on bodyweight exercises. Eon states that “if you really want to know how your body can support weight, you must first understand how your body feels when doing specific movements.” Eon’s training varies anywhere from statics, to tricking at a cadence of two days on and two days off for a month for four hours at a time each training day. As far as diet goes, Eon gives a shout out to yogurt, saying that he will eat a tub daily. So far, Eon has participated in 10 competitions, placing in two. His next competition will be held in Miami in December. This competition will be 1:1 based on skillset and record- which will be assessed by how many competitions each person has won.

 

“Slow down and do not be so rushed,” Eon shares. That can apply to all areas of life and training.” If you want to follow Eon and his journey you can find him on Instagram at https://www.instagram.com/plancheperfect/

Written by: Cortney Wilbanks