Getting Over The Mental Hurdles

By: Omari Bernard

           Easier said than done right? We have all faced mental roadblocks that catch us dead on our tracks, and the truth is there will be more hurdles in our lives that we will have to face. The goal isn’t necessarily about eliminating our existing troubles, as it is, about building the mental fortitude that will give us the confidence needed to break down those barriers.

So what exactly is a mental hurdle? It’s typically when we are
confronted by a particular situation that creates an internal
resistance from moving forward. The brain sees it as a threat, which
then, causes a malfunction of the nervous system leading to
paralysis of the mind. This, in turn, creates a domino effect,
compromising the limbic system that is responsible for the whole
decision-making process.
Think of when there is a dysfunction on your computer. The screen
freezes and you are unable to continue whatever you were doing. So,
what do we do when this happens? We try to reset the computer,
and that is exactly what we need to do when we find ourselves in
these situations.
First things first is recognizing and acknowledging that a problem
exists. Once acknowledged, the nerves innervating start to excite
the synapsis in our brain to create possible solutions to the problem
at hand.

The mind finds it easier to grasp the concept in following steps. So
for that reason, here are 4 steps you can take in helping yourself reset.

The Steps:
1) Create the time and safe place. This helps to slow down the thoughts that tend to run through our minds, so the
process discovery can begin.

2) Express gratitude. Make a list of 5 things you are grateful for. Once in a state of gratitude, you enter a space of
receiving, and it is in this space you become more open and receptive and less resistant and hesitant.

3) Be intentional. Ask yourself why and what is the reason you may feel like you’re at a rock in a hard place, and be
ready to unpack all the thoughts that have been living in your head. Journaling is an effective way of getting all
those thoughts and limiting beliefs we have of ourselves out of our minds and on paper. Now, what we do
afterwards is up to us. Some people share it with a close friend or family member, some people seek counseling,
others may confront the situation, the person, or in some cases they must face the person they see in the mirror.

4) Find an accountability system. Whether this is a professional coach, a coworker, friend, or family member, it’s
ultimately your choice. Just make sure to choose someone of trust that is reliable and consistent. How you choose to
check-in or assess is up to you. The rest is yet to unfold.

There is a sense of empowerment that comes from overcoming a hurdle. The brain recognizes this a good thing, and
immediately creates a neurological connection to the new stimulus. The more we feed this neuron, the more positive
feedback and feel good hormones are released, thus creating a “good experience.” It gives us a new level of confidence
that can encourage and uplift us in ways we may not even be able to fully comprehend at the time. It isn’t until we are
faced with another hurdle that we may be able to fully grasp the true level of growth we have experienced. The clarity,
strength, confidence, and knowledge gained cannot be measured. You are no longer the same person you were before
the hurdle. You’ve become wiser. Experiences teach us a lot about ourselves, and as long as we continue experiencing we
have the opportunity to continue growing.

You can follow Omari Bernard Here on Instagram or by visiting his website http://therreviveretreats.com